Is that email really from IATA?

The problem of fraudulent IATA emails has resurfaced again, reports the British International Freight Association.
Criminals send emails seeking payment for products, services, or other outstanding amounts due, often using names similar or identical to those of IATA officials.
Worryingly, says BIFA, the fraudsters now seem to have mastered the art of cloning the IATA suffix (@iata.org), although their spelling leaves a lot to be desired – for example, [email protected] or @iatainvoces.org.
A common tactic is to demand payment to prevent an IATA code from expiring.
IATA agency codes do not expire and all such emails should be reported to IATA at [email protected] and then deleted.
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