Boeing fined $3.9m for ‘installing faulty parts on 133 aircraft’

By Rachelle Harry

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued Boeing a penalty fine of $3,916,871 for allegedly installing faulty slat tracks on some of its planes.

In a statement, the FAA explained: “Slat tracks are located on the leading edge of the wings of a Boeing 737 and are used to guide the movement of panels known as slats. These panels provide additional lift during takeoff and landing. The FAA further alleges that Boeing knowingly submitted aircraft for final FAA airworthiness certification after determining that the parts could not be used due to a failed strength test.”

Boeing allegedly installed these faulty parts onto approximately 133 aircraft before knowingly “submitting the aircraft for final FAA airworthiness certification after determining that the parts could not be used due to a failed strength test”.

The FAA alleges that Boeing “failed to adequately oversee its suppliers to ensure they complied with the company’s quality assurance system”. This failure, the FAA said, resulted in the installation of slat tracks that were weakened by a condition known as hydrogen embrittlement that occurred during cadmium-titanium plating.

Boeing has 30 days to respond to the FAA’s penalty letter.

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