Regulators take to the TIACA stage on advance data rules

Regulators and the air cargo industry must continue to work closely if impending advance data rules are not to impede cargo flows, delegates at TIACA’s Executive Summit (ES) were told.
Regulators from Europe, the US and Canada formed a panel for the first time to engage with industry at the event, held in Miami.
“This is the first time that the key regulators for all of the advance data programs have sat together with industry to review and discuss how and when the programmes will be implemented and to hear the industry’s perspective,” said Doug Brittin, secretary general, TIACA.
“We appreciate this opportunity to have a frank and open discussion as well as their commitment to working with industry.”
Representatives from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the European Union (EU), Transport Canada, Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), World Customs Organization (WCO), and the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO) gave updates on their advance data pilot schemes and to take questions from delegates.
Officials at the summit agreed with delegates that the 7+1 data set currently used in the pilot programme is sufficient for civil aviation risk assessment and can be provided early in the supply chain.
Formalisation of advance data regulations is slow however, and solutions are needed to ensure small and medium forwarders will be able to comply and are not put at a commercial disadvantage.
“It is good to have a dialogue, but we need to get our base camp organised and focus on data quality and, importantly what we are going to do with the referrals,” Kester Meijer, director operational integrity – DSQM, KLM Cargo said from the floor. “How are we as industry going to manage referrals, what is the next step?”
TIACA’s senior director of government affairs, Sue Presti, called on industry to take responsibility for giving feedback to regulators: “Industry has been part of this from the start and that must continue.
“When notice of rulemaking is given, we will be urging our members to give feedback from their own company perspective, just as we will be doing as TIACA.”
Asha Menon, senior technical officer, compliance and facilitation directorate, WCO, who took part in the panel, stressed the need for regulators and industry to work to raise awareness of advance data regulations. “Forums such as the one today are important,” she said.
TIACA recently published a position paper on advance data calling for a phased approach to implementing the new rules.
For more information and to download the white paper, visit www.tiaca.org
Picture, from left to right – Todd Boucher, Trusted Traders Programs Director, CBSA, Craig Clark, Program Manager – Office of Cargo Conveyance Security, US Customs and Border Protection, Valerie Trojanowska, Technical Officer – Air Cargo Security, ICAO, Annegret Rohloff, Policy Officer Risk Management and Security, European Commission, Doug Brittin, Secretary General TIACA, Asha Menon, Senior Technical Officer – Compliance & Facilitation Directorate, World Customs Organization, Justin Jedlinski, Chief, Integrated Cargo Security, Aviation Security Directorate, Transport Canada,Warren Miller, Air Cargo Engagement Manager, TSA, Francesco Faiulo, Policy Officer, European Commission, DG MOVE

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