AEI launches B737-800 conversion

CARGO aircraft conversions specialist Aeronautical Engineers Inc (AEI) has formally launched a passenger-to-freighter (12-pallet) and passenger-to-combi (five) programme for the B737-800.
The twin projects have been under study in the past year and will be marketed as B737-800SF (Special Freighter) and B737-800C (Combination Passenger and Freighter) respectively.
Development costs are being fully funded by AEI and the modifications will be performed at Commercial Jet’s Miami Florida facility, which is one of five authorised AEI conversion centres worldwide.
AEI will make both conversions available at all its authorised conversion centres shortly after issuance of certification by the FAA and expects the initial development and certification to take up to three years, a statement says.
Robert Convey, vice-president of sales and marketing at AEI, says: “As with many successful freighter conversion programmes in the past, the B737-800 has now entered the ‘zone of conversion’, with the oldest units approaching 15 years.
“This conversion program is unique when compared to past programmes in that the B737-800 is still in production and its replacement, the B737 MAX 8 is nearing entry into service. What this means is that owners and operators will for the first time have access to modern narrowbody converted freighters.”
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