Canadian shippers set to screen air cargo

Canada is edging closer to a revised air cargo security process that will allow shippers to screen outbound airfreight consignments prior to arrival at an airport.
Department officials at Transport Canada estimate that the amendments would result in a net benefit of C$202m over 10 years.
“Shippers need to be given the authority to screen their own goods,” said Transport Canada, adding: “In order to do so, there must be a regulatory framework in place to establish, maintain and enforce a security program that international partners will recognize.”
The fresh proposals by the federal government in Ottawa aim to replace the current registered shipper process with “a more robust known-consignor program, in order to address security gaps in the secure supply chain,” said Transport Canada.
The country’s current Air Cargo Security Program does not allow shippers to screen and secure their own goods intended to go by air.
The proposed amendments would allow consignors or originators of the freight to become known-consignors and to screen and tender their own goods as secure cargo, either to members of the existing Air Cargo Security Program or directly to air carriers.
Transport Canada says that goods worth C$100bn are processed every year at Canadian airports, with more than 400 tonnes of cargo moved on passenger aircraft. Eighty per cent of all air cargo departing Canadian airports is destined for non–US international destinations.
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